CodingBison

There are two common ways to represent a graph: adjacency list and adjacency matrix. This page discusses adjacency list. An adjacency list allows us to represent both vertices and edges of a graph. Adjacency list uses two types of linked lists. all the vertices are added using a linked list. Second, all of the edges that belong to a vertex are added in another linked list that is based off of that vertex. If a vertex does not have any edges, then the linked list for edges would be empty.

Before we go further, let us see how a graph looks like. Well, to put it simply, we can consider a graph to be a collection of vertices and edges. We provide a simple (undirected) graph that has 5 vertices and 4 edges; each vertex is identified by a number.



Figure: An undirected Graph

The adjacency list for the above graph would start with a linked list for vertices -- this list would have all the 5 vertices. Further, for each vertex, the representation would also have a linked list of all the edges that are connected to them. As an example, the vertex 280 has one edge: 280-101. So, for the vertex 280, we would see that its linked-list for edges would have one entry: 101. Please note that for an undirected graph, every edge would show up twice in the graph, one time with each vertex. Thus, 280-101 edge would mean an edge of 101 added to the vertex 280 and an edge of 280 added to the vertex 101. This is how the adjacency list would look like for the above graph.



Figure: Adjacency list Representation

Besides undirected graphs, a graph can also additional behavior as well. The graph can also have loops. In this case, we would have edges connected to each other so that it forms a loop. In the above example, if we were to add an edge between 680 and 880 vertices, then we would have a loop. An adjacency list can accommodate graphs with loops. The graph can also have directed edges. In that case, it is not a given that one can go in either direction. In the above example, if we were to make the edge 101-680 undirected such that we can go only from 101 to 680, then the picture would have an arrow going from 101 to 680. In terms of adjacency list, we would have 680 edge-node added to vertex 101, but we would not add edge-node 101 to vertex 680.

Implementation

In terms of data-structures, the adjacency list implementation should offer data structures for both edges and vertices. In terms of functionality, the implementation should offer functions for adding vertices, adding edges, at the very least. Before we get into the implementation details, our implementation provides the following functions. The adjlist_add_vertex() function adds a Vertex to an adjacency list. Its counterpart, adjlist_add_edge() adds an edge to the adjacency list. The adjlist_free() frees all the elements in the adjacency list and returns the previously malloced memory. Lastly, the adjlist_print() traverses the adjacency list and print its elements.

Let us start by providing the implementation and go over its details after that. The implementation (provided below) contains both data-structures and functions.

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

 typedef struct vertex_node_ {
     int val;                         /* Holds an int. */
     struct edge_node_   *list_enode; /* This is a linked list for all connected edges. */
     struct vertex_node_ *next_vnode; /* This is the vertical linked list for all vertices. */
 } vertex_node;

 typedef struct edge_node_ {
     void              *parent_vnode; /* Pointer to the parent vertex node. */
     struct edge_node_ *next_enode;   /* This is a linked list. */
 } edge_node;

 /* Root of the graph */
 vertex_node *graph_root = NULL;

 /* Add a Vertex to an Adjacency List */
 void adjlist_add_vertex (int current_value) {
     vertex_node *new_vnode, *vnode;

     vnode = graph_root;
     while (vnode && vnode->next_vnode) {
         /* Check, if the value already exists. */
         if (vnode->val == current_value) {
             printf("Vertex already exists. No need to add\n");
             return;
         }
         vnode = vnode->next_vnode;
     }

     printf("[%s] Adding Vertex Node (%d)\n", __FUNCTION__, current_value);
     new_vnode = (vertex_node *)malloc(sizeof(vertex_node));
     if (!new_vnode) {
         return;
     }
     new_vnode->val = current_value;
     new_vnode->list_enode = NULL;
     new_vnode->next_vnode = NULL;

     if (!graph_root) {
         graph_root = new_vnode;
         return;
     }
     vnode->next_vnode = new_vnode;
 }

 /* Add an Edge to a Vertex */
 void adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex (vertex_node *first_vnode, 
                                           vertex_node *second_vnode, 
                                           int val_second_vertex) { 
     edge_node *enode, *prev_enode, *new_enode;

     if (!first_vnode || !second_vnode)
         return;

     prev_enode = enode = first_vnode->list_enode;
     while (enode) {
         if (((vertex_node *)enode->parent_vnode)->val == val_second_vertex) {
             printf("Edge is already added to this Vertex. No need to add\n");
             return;
         }
         prev_enode = enode;
         enode = enode->next_enode;
     }

     new_enode = (edge_node *)malloc(sizeof(edge_node));
     if (!new_enode) {
         fprintf(stderr, "[%s] Malloc failed \n", __FUNCTION__);
         return;
     }
     new_enode->parent_vnode = second_vnode;
     new_enode->next_enode = NULL;
     if (prev_enode) {
         prev_enode->next_enode = (void *)new_enode;
     } else {
         /* prev_enode is NULL means new_enode is the first enode for this vertex */
         first_vnode->list_enode = (void *)new_enode;
     }
 }

 /* Add an Edge to the Adjacency List */
 void adjlist_add_edge (int vertexA, int vertexB) {
     vertex_node *vertex_nodeA = NULL, *vertex_nodeB = NULL, *vnode;

     /* 
      * First, find the vnode for both vertices in the edge. We will 
      * add an enode to both of these vnodes.
      */
     for (vnode = graph_root; vnode != NULL; vnode = vnode->next_vnode) {
         if (vnode->val == vertexA) {
             vertex_nodeA = vnode;
         }
         if (vnode->val == vertexB) {
             vertex_nodeB = vnode;
         }
         if ((vertex_nodeA) && (vertex_nodeB)) {
             break;
         }
     }

     if (!vertex_nodeA) {
         printf("[%s] vertex_nodeA [%d] not found in list of vertices\n", __FUNCTION__, vertexA);
         return;
     }

     if (!vertex_nodeB) {
         printf("[%s] vertex_nodeB [%d] not found in list of vertices\n", __FUNCTION__, vertexB);
         return;
     }

     printf("[%s] Adding Edge (%d-%d) to the adj list\n", __FUNCTION__, vertexA, vertexB);

     /* Add Edge to VertexA. When added, this edge would point to VertexB */
     printf("\t[%s] Adding Edge (%d-%d) to Vertex Node (%d) \n", 
                     __FUNCTION__, vertexA, vertexB, vertexA);
     adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex(vertex_nodeA, vertex_nodeB, vertexB); 

     /* Add Edge to VertexB. When added, this edge would point to VertexA */
     printf("\t[%s] Adding Edge (%d-%d) to Vertex Node (%d) \n", 
                     __FUNCTION__, vertexA, vertexB, vertexB);
     adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex(vertex_nodeB, vertex_nodeA, vertexA); 
 }

 /* Free the Adjacency List */
 void adjlist_free () {
     vertex_node *vnode = NULL, *prev_vnode = NULL;
     edge_node *enode = NULL, *prev_enode = NULL;

     vnode = graph_root;
     /* Walk the list of vertex nodes. */
     while (vnode) { 
         /* For each vertex node, walk the list of edge nodes. */
         enode = vnode->list_enode;
         while (enode) {
             prev_enode = enode;
             enode = enode->next_enode;
             free(prev_enode);
         }
         prev_vnode = vnode;
         vnode = vnode->next_vnode;
         free(prev_vnode);
     }
     graph_root = NULL;
 }

 /* Print the Adjacency List */
 void adjlist_print () {
     vertex_node *vnode = NULL;
     edge_node *enode = NULL;

     printf("[%s] Print the Adjacency List", __FUNCTION__); 
     if (!graph_root) {
         printf("\n[%s] Nothing to print. Return\n", __FUNCTION__); 
         return;
     }

     for (vnode = graph_root; vnode != NULL; vnode = vnode->next_vnode) {
         printf("\n\tVertex [%3d]:", vnode->val);
         for (enode = vnode->list_enode; enode != NULL; enode = enode->next_enode) {
             printf(" -- Edge [%3d]", ((vertex_node *)enode->parent_vnode)->val); 
         }
     }
     printf("\n");
 }

 int main () {
     int vertices[] = {101, 237, 880, 680, 280};
     int edges[][3] = {{237, 880}, {101, 680}, {101, 280}, {237, 101}};
     int len = sizeof(vertices)/sizeof(vertices[0]);
     int i;

     /* Add the vertices. */
      printf("Adding all the Vertices\n"); 
     for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
         adjlist_add_vertex(vertices[i]); 
     }

     /* Print the Adjacency List before adding all the edges */
     adjlist_print();

     /* Add the edges. */
     printf("\nAdding all the Edges\n"); 
     len = sizeof(edges)/sizeof(edges[0]);
     for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
         adjlist_add_edge(edges[i][0], edges[i][1]);
     }

     /* Print the Adjacency List after adding all the edges */
     adjlist_print();

     /* Done with the Adjacency List. Free it*/
     adjlist_free();
 }

Let us first start with data-structures. The above file has two data structures: vertex_node for vertices and edge_node for edges. The vertex_node data-structures supports two linked lists -- one for the vertices and one for the edges belonging to a given vertex. The next_vnode pointer enables linked list for vertices and all the vertices of a graph are added to this linked list. The list_enode pointer enables linked list for all edges that belong to a given vertex.

Besides the linked list pointer (next_enode), the edge_node also contains one additional members. The "parent_vnode" pointer holds the the address of the vertex node that is added to the edge list. Thus, if an edge is formed by vertices A-B, then when we add the edge to the vertex A, the parent_vnode of the edge would point to the vertex B. Likewise, when we add the edge A-B to the vertex B, the parent_vnode of the edge would point to the vertex A. Depending upon the use-case, it is possible to simplify this where the edge node contains the value (identifier) of the vertex. However, keeping a pointer allows us to have the edge node access the entire data associated with the vertex node and for cases, where we need to store more than an integer (the "val" member), a pointer would be more efficient.

Next, let us go over these functions.

The adjlist_add_vertex() is the function that adds a vertex to the adjacency list. It starts by walking the vertices linked list. If it finds an existing vertex with the same identifier (value), then it bails out. If not, then it walks to last vnode of the list. If the vertex is not found, then it mallocs a new vertex node and adds it to the last node.

The adjlist_add_edge() is the function that adds an edge to the graph. The edge consists of two vertices and so this function essentially means adding both the vertices to each other. Thus, 280-101 edge would mean an edge of 101 added to the vertex 280 and an edge of 280 added to the vertex 101. For doing that, we walk the vertex node linked list and using the passed value of the two vertices, get hold of pointers for both vertices: vertex_nodeA and vertex_nodeB. Once that is done, we call adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex() to add corresponding edges to vertex_nodeA and vertex_nodeB. The adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex() function is internal since we do not add it in the header file -- as a result, users of this implementation would not be able to access that function. This is okay since there is no need to expose internal functions. The adjlist_internal_add_edge_to_vertex() function walks the edge linked list and adds this new edge, if it does not exist already.

The adjlist_print() and adjlist_free() are in some ways traversal routines. They walk over each vertex and edge of the graph. The adjlist_free() function that frees up all vertices and edges belonging to the graph. The adjlist_print() prints all the vertices and edges belonging to the graph -- we can use this to dump all edges and vertices belonging to a graph.

In the end, we have the main function that provides a simple user-case of the adjacency list implementation. From this function, we invoke above functions to add vertices, add edges, print the adjacency list, and then in the end, free the graph. Here is the compilation step and the output.

 user@codingtree$ gcc adjacency_list.c -o adjacency
 user@codingtree$ ./adjacency 
 Adding all the Vertices
 [adjlist_add_vertex] Adding Vertex Node (101)
 [adjlist_add_vertex] Adding Vertex Node (237)
 [adjlist_add_vertex] Adding Vertex Node (880)
 [adjlist_add_vertex] Adding Vertex Node (680)
 [adjlist_add_vertex] Adding Vertex Node (280)
 [adjlist_print] Print the Adjacency List
         Vertex [101]:
         Vertex [237]:
         Vertex [880]:
         Vertex [680]:
         Vertex [280]:

 Adding all the Edges
 [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-880) to the adj list
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-880) to Vertex Node (237) 
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-880) to Vertex Node (880) 
 [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-680) to the adj list
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-680) to Vertex Node (101) 
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-680) to Vertex Node (680) 
 [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-280) to the adj list
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-280) to Vertex Node (101) 
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (101-280) to Vertex Node (280) 
 [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-101) to the adj list
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-101) to Vertex Node (237) 
         [adjlist_add_edge] Adding Edge (237-101) to Vertex Node (101) 
 [adjlist_print] Print the Adjacency List
         Vertex [101]: -- Edge [680] -- Edge [280] -- Edge [237]
         Vertex [237]: -- Edge [880] -- Edge [101]
         Vertex [880]: -- Edge [237]
         Vertex [680]: -- Edge [101]
         Vertex [280]: -- Edge [101]

In the output, we can see that we start by adding the vertices and then add all of the edges. When done adding the vertices, the output from the adjlist_print() shows all of the vertices added to the linked list. For each vertex, we print its identifier (the value). After that we add all the edges. When we print the adjacency list for the second time, we can see the true form of the adjacency list. We find various edges added to their respective vertices. Thus, the vertex 101 has three edges: 101-680, 101-280, and 101-237. As we mentioned earlier, each edge shows as twice in the adjacency list. Thus, for 101-680 edge, we would see that the edge 680 is added to vertex 101 as well as edge 101 is added to the vertex 680.

Advanced Implementation

Due to sake of simplicity, we have kept the above implementation (intentionally) simple. Let us now give some thoughts as to how we can make the above implementation better.

First, we can certainly make the above code more modular. Instead of having one monolithic file, we can split it into three files: (a) a header file that publishes the data-structures and the APIs, (b) a C file that contains the implementation of the published APIs, and (c) another C file that contains the main() routine and uses the adjacency list implementation. When we use this implementation for various applications, having the implementation in three different files allows applications to reuse the header file and the implementation file.

Second, the above implementation has the graph_root as a global variable. This will work fine, if we keep this in one single file. However, when we have multiple applications reusing the same implementation, then keeping graph_root as global would not work. In that case, we must allow each application to define and use their own graph_root variable.

Third, for a generic application, we would probably need to add more information for both vertex and edges nodes. For vertex nodes, we could add information like node color, some node-specific data, etc. For edges nodes, we could add information like weight of the edge, etc.

If you would like to see an implementation that follows the above recommendation to make the code more generic, then you can find the complete program here: Advanced Implementation of Adjacency List.





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